Dr Richard Feldman

Dr Richard Feldman Nashville TN

Outpatient Surgery Center

Medical Establishment’s Attempts to Halt His Success

Dr. Feldman’s success bred a contemptuous response from the traditional medical community. Not only did he provide services in his own practice at lower costs, as a political activist he campaigned to reduce medical costs to consumers across America. He reached to Senator Kennedy and others on the Federal level with plans for cost reduction.

 

Dr. Feldman became the medical director of the state’s first outpatient surgery center, Parkside Surgery Center. When the corporations-for-profit medical companies like HCA saw the potential negative impact to their bottom lines, moves to cease this operation were made. A boycott led by Thomas Frist, M.D., and Tom Nesbitt failed to close the surgery center’s doors. Dr. Feldman was offered the equivalent in today’s terms of more than a million dollar fee to stop its operation and move to Saudi Arabia, which Dr. Feldman rejected. Such outpatient surgery centers have since become the norm in U.S. medical care.

 

He confronted the establishment by speaking for those who were harmed through negligent care and malpractice at the hands of their own physicians. As a defender of the abused and mistreated patients in malpractice cases, the establishment rose against him. But he stood for what was right – for the harmed patients even though it was the fault of a medical provider while the establishment banded together to hide their faults. He acted as an expert witness in cases that other doctors were not willing to take to help these victims in the state of Tennessee. He clearly understood the possible retaliation from the Board, but he chose to do what was right. He helped alleviate the pain of many who had received damaging treatments in traditional, highly respected health care facilities. By providing expert testimony on their behalf, silent settlements passed to those he assisted.

 

He expanded the options for medical weight loss for his patients in Tennessee with safe, effective methods, which were so beneficial to his patients that his practice flourished. He wanted to freely advertise to reach more in need. In collaboration with attorney Lewis Laska in legal actions, advertising regulations for physicians in Tennessee were modified to allow the public to receive more information before choosing physicians and making major medical decisions. Increased advertising by physicians aided the people who needed specific services. Dr. Feldman’s fight to reduce advertising regulations for physicians granted the public access to more information of some unconventional weight loss and fat-reduction methods, such as mesotherapy. He refused to yield to the local medical regime that offered underhanded approaches to silence his mission.